Kennedy Falls

We thought we’d be discovering. We thought we’d be exploring trails no longer traveled, finding a long forgotten waterfall at the end of a an uncertain journey. But after being prominently featured on various hiking sites about 3 years ago the trail to Kennedy Falls no longer offers the touted solitude and we were running into droves of other people hungry for adventure.

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Yak Peak

If you have ever driven Coquihalla Highway you will recognize one of the most prominent sideway features – the east face of Yak Peak. An impressive vertical, one smooth piece of a granitic block, it rises above the highway and begs the question how does one (and that means one without a rope or climbing skills) get up there. Well, there is a trail, next to the face, that will, shockingly, take you aaaall the way. To. The. Summit.

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Mount Bishop

Mount Bishop summit has been eluding me for a few years now, but not for the lack of trying. On our last attempt (#3) we got REALLY close but had to retreat because we were running desperately out of daylight. And that happened because after having biked all the way to the Seymour Hatchery, the obedient citizen Chris refused to trespass over a newly constructed Bear Island bridge (which was like 2 days before an official opening), so we had to backtrack aaaaall the way to the Hydraulic Connector, loosing 1.5 hrs of daylight in the process? Well, no hard feelings there but it left me with an urge to get to up Mt. Bishop for real.

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Widgeon Lake

I like, ehm, logistically involved trips. Those which involve multiple means of transportation and complicated arrangements from water taxis (at a minimum) to scheduled float plane pick ups in order to just get to the starting point. The trip to Widgeon Lake was somewhere in the “moderate-low” range of that scale but offered great rewards for that little bit of extra effort.

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Burns Bog

Burns Bog is a large swath of wetland covering most of the area between highways 17, 91 and 99 in Delta. It is eight times larger than Stanley Park but only a minuscule part of it is accessible to the public. I always imagined Burns Bog as a bubbly swamp with fog rolling over it and a monster’s hand reaching out from the depths and after you ankle. Well, on Sunday we went to find out.

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Belcarra Park

As part of our All Regional Parks quest we decided to visit Belcarra Park in Port Moody. There are many ways how to explore Belcarra – hike, bike, stroll, swim, kayak or enjoy a picnic. We had a few hours to work with before the forecast rain was supposed to hit at 2 pm so we brought our bikes to cover some good distance and set off down one of the trails. And were we ever pleasantly surprised!

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Tunnel Bluffs

Big trees, cushions of bright green moss, the solitude and a fantastic view at the end – the Tunnel Bluffs trail is grossly underrated, my dear friends. Why is this hike not even listed in the bible of local hiking, the “103 Hikes” guidebook? For that or whatever the reason, you will not be running into other people on this trail and you can have all the wonderful lookout points to yourself. You’re welcome. So lets’ just dive in: there is a number of good route descriptions to follow, however, and read this carefully, I found some of the instructions confusing so here are my own notes and ad addendums: 

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